Recent Posts

January 01, 2018

Film Review - 'Fantastic Mr. Fox'


Based on Roald Dahl’s children’s novel, “Fantastic Mr. Fox” is a 2009 stop-motion film directed by Wes Anderson.
The film is highly visual and features a great level of detail. Compared to modern animation, stop-motion adds an artistic element. There is a nuanced quality, where things are not quite perfect, but that’s what separates it from other animated films.
Mature themes are incorporated into the story arc and this makes the film enjoyable for adults and kids alike.
The film was nominated for numerous awards, including two Oscars and a Golden Globe.
 
 

The Movie Club will be screening “Fantastic Mr Fox” on Wednesday 10 January 6pm sharp at Narellan Library. Tea, coffee and biscuits provided, BYO snacks are more than welcome. Stay after the screening for a short discussion about the film. See the discussion questions to get some ideas.

December 06, 2017

Film Review - 'Scrooged'


Based on Charles Dicken’s classic, ‘A Christmas Carol’, Scrooged is a 1988 interpretation starring Bill Murray as the scrooge Frank Cross. Frank is a big-shot TV executive who is about to learn the meaning of Christmas from three ghosts.

The film has been criticised for not having enough ‘Christmas spirit’, however, this may be done on purpose to contextualise the story for a contemporary audience.
 

‘Scrooged’ succeeds in pulling off a humorous and current adaptation of the classic Christmas story, however, it cannot be compared to the traditional ‘A Christmas Carol’.

The Movie Club will be screening ‘Scrooged’ on Wednesday 13 December, 6pm sharp at Narellan Library. Tea, coffee and biscuits provided, BYO snacks are more than welcome. Stay after the screening for a short discussion about the film. See the discussion questions to get some ideas.

November 01, 2017

Film Review - 'Midnight in Paris'

Midnight in Paris is a 2011 film from director Woody Allen. The film focuses on the main character of Gil, an American who navigates his way around Paris with his fiancée.
The film incorporates elements of fantasy and nostalgia as Gil mysteriously goes back in time to 1920s Paris each night at midnight.
 
The film presents a visible tension between American and French culture, or rather, the stereotypes that American culture holds of France.
 
 
Themes of nostalgia, memory, and history are ruminated upon against a romantic Parisian background and this allows for an exploration of characters and of the city itself.
With many of Allen’s films set in New York, ‘Midnight in Paris’ is a rich and vibrant departure.
The Movie Club will be screening ‘Midnight in Paris’ on Wednesday 8 November, 6pm sharp at Narellan Library. Tea, coffee and biscuits provided, BYO snacks are more than welcome. Stay after the screening for a short discussion about the film. See the discussion questions to get some ideas.

October 04, 2017

Film Review - 'Vertigo'

‘Vertigo’ is considered to be one of Alfred Hitchcock’s defining films along with ‘Psycho’ and ‘North by Northwest’. With an intelligent script and intense stylised editing it will keep you intrigued to the end.
The film begins with Scottie, a private investigator, who comes to the realisation he has vertigo. Now out of work, Scottie agrees to help his friend Gavin to investigate his wife’s odd behaviour. This leads to a series of tense and unforgettable events.
The film is compelling both as a stand-alone story which is mysterious and smart, but even more intriguing to know is that the film is one of Hitchcock’s most confessional. Scottie represents Hitchcock and the way he used, feared and controlled women.
 
An intense look at the dangers of obsession, desire and control, the film is striking in visual effects, particularly the final scene. The themes remain relevant to a contemporary audience, and will make you re-think the roles of men and women in society, particularly the way some can manipulate and ‘mould’ others.
The Movie Club will be screening ‘Vertigo’ on Wednesday 11 October, 6pm sharp at Narellan Library. Tea, coffee and biscuits provided, BYO snacks are more than welcome. Stay after the screening for a short discussion about the film. See the discussion questions to get some ideas.

September 04, 2017

Film Review - 'Hunt for the Wilderpeople'


‘Hunt for the Wilderpeople’ is one of those special films which uses humour to make you feel more human, more compassionate perhaps, more connected to yourself and your surroundings. The film tells the story of foster kid Ricky – young, rebellious and habitually rejected. Ricky finds himself in the care of Hec and Bella, an older couple living in a rural area. When Ricky attempts to escape and Hec goes looking for him, what ensues is a nation-wide man-hunt. A fresh and natural dialogue keeps the film away from clichĂ© territory and the New Zealand wilderness adds another layer of meaning to this very human story.
The film comes from New Zealand director, Taika Waititi, who also directed ‘Boy’. Waititi is known for creating a strong sense of voice in his films. ‘Hunt for the Wilderpeople’ has a voice, a nuanced voice that is refreshing and original.
 

The film was nominated for 25 awards across numerous international film festivals, including the Audience Award at the Edinburgh International Film Festival.

The Movie Club will be screening ‘Hunt for the Wilderpeople’ on Wednesday 13 September, 6pm sharp at Narellan Library. Tea, coffee and biscuits provided, BYO snacks are more than welcome. Stay after the screening for a short discussion about the film. See the discussion questions to get some ideas.